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Boeing Is Taking Another Beating On Social Media


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Posted (edited)

Dunno if anybody here has been keeping up with the Boeing news the last several months or so but this certainly isn't going to help their reputation.

 

Boeing is catching heat for this one even though it's not yet determined to be their fault, and is unlikely to be. their fault according to the experts.

 

When the flight attendants say keep your seat buckled, they aren't kidding.  Turbulence kills... literally

 

 

*2nd* edit

Plane have no way to detect clear air turbulence.  Boeing and the airline won't be getting sued.

https://apnews.com/article/singapore-airlines-turbulence-bangkok-hospitalized-c3750c6b6f611acd771766b999d7468d

 

Quote

The U.S.-based Association of Flight Attendants said clear air turbulence is virtually undetectable with current technology. “One second, you’re cruising smoothly; the next, passengers, crew and unsecured carts or other items are being thrown around the cabin,” it said.

 

*edit* Yep.  Looks to be clear air turbulence.  The last sentence in the article is a bit disturbing.  https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/c8889d7x8j4o

 

 

 

 

Edited by Sabrefan1
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My wife was telling me about this situation this morning.  She's quite nervous about flying in general, and this kind of story doesn't help her nerves at all.

 

39 minutes ago, Sabrefan1 said:

When the flight attendants say keep your seat buckled, they aren't kidding.  Turbulence kills... literally

 

Fully agreed.  I keep my seatbelt on unless I need to go to the can - and I nearly had my turn during a long-haul trip one year when I was in the can and unexpected turbulence hit.  Thank goodness there was no spraying happening at the time; I'd hate to smell of piss and/or portapotty disinfectant for the rest of the flight.  I couldn't get out of the can and back to my seat fast enough.

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Not sure why it’s on Boeing. Turbulence is expected and a known known. Flight plans/paths are not Boeing’s issue. 
 

Should a car company be held responsible for passengers not wearing seat belts during a hard braking incident or a MVA situation? 
 

Passengers are told initially and then repeatedly to keep their seatbelts on. 
 

Old people should be wise enough in how to keep themselves safe. 
 

Death is coming for the oldies/goldies first and foremost at all times. 
 

 

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:

Not sure why it’s on Boeing. Turbulence is expected and a known known. Flight plans/paths are not Boeing’s issue. 
 

Should a car company be held responsible for passengers not wearing seat belts during a hard braking incident or a MVA situation? 
 

Passengers are told initially and then repeatedly to keep their seatbelts on. 
 

Old people should be wise enough in how to keep themselves safe. 
 

Death is coming for the oldies/goldies first and foremost at all times. 
 

 

 

 

I fully agree.

 

However, I don't feel bad for Boeing though.  Their company hired bean counters to run it instead of engineers and just like with Intel, their product reputation is on as down-slope as a result of the bad habits that they've accumulated.  Intel is slowly righting their ship, but Boeing seems to be doubling down on their mess.

 

People will be people though and pile on for the fun of it whether it's legitimate or not.

Edited by Sabrefan1
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18 minutes ago, Sabrefan1 said:

 

 

I fully agree.

 

However, I don't feel bad for Boeing though.  Their company hired bean counters to run it instead of engineers and just like with Intel, their product reputation is on as down-slope as a result of the bad habits that they've accumulated.  Intel is slowly righting their ship, but Boeing seems to be doubling down on their mess.

 

People will be people though and pile on for the fun of it whether it's legitimate or not.


I mean I generally agree with you about what you’ve said in this post, but specifically, maybe you could edit your post to reflect that Boeing had/has really nothing to do with with the death of this senior citizen. 
 

 

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8 minutes ago, luckylager said:

If this 73yo man was whistleblower, Boeing definitely planted the turbulence...

 

The only thing more dangerous than flying in a Boeing, is being a Boeing whistleblower...

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3 hours ago, Sharpshooter said:


I mean I generally agree with you about what you’ve said in this post, but specifically, maybe you could edit your post to reflect that Boeing had/has really nothing to do with with the death of this senior citizen. 
 

 

 

I purposely worded it the way I did and straddled the line with my second sentence because the only experience that I have flying a plane is 14 hours in a Cesna 150 (2 seater).  By the time I decided to forgo getting a license, I was barely able to do "touch and goes" consistently.

 

I know what turbulence is and it looks like it to me in the video, but if a news story comes out and says that the 3k feet drop was caused by a faulty Boeing auto-pilot I will take a ding for coming out and pretending like I know for sure what happened.  I try not to use absolutes in something I'm not confidently familiar with.  That includes flying large 4 engine jets.

 

Quote

Boeing is catching heat for this one even though it's not yet determined to be their fault, and is unlikely to be. 

 

 

 

To that end I'll do a quick check on the story and see where the investigation is and if the UK has come out and said anything.  The story was fairly new when I originally posted.

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3 hours ago, Sharpshooter said:

I mean I generally agree with you about what you’ve said in this post, but specifically, maybe you could edit your post to reflect that Boeing had/has really nothing to do with with the death of this senior citizen.

 

Did a quick recheck of the story and the working theory is "clear air turbulence".   I added in an edit to my original post as follows...

 

Quote

*edit* Yep.  Looks to be clear air turbulence.  The last sentence in the article is a bit disturbing.  https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/c8889d7x8j4o

 

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1 hour ago, Sabrefan1 said:

 

Did a quick recheck of the story and the working theory is "clear air turbulence".   I added in an edit to my original post as follows...

 

 


I get you are ‘clearing’ Boeing. 
 

I hope you are now proffering that. 
 

In any case, this was a situation where passengers weren’t in their seats and buckled up. 

Fuck around and find out, despite age. 
 

This is a warning to all people who are passengers of any aircraft, for any duration. 
 

 

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45 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:


I get you are ‘clearing’ Boeing. 
 

I hope you are now proffering that. 
 

In any case, this was a situation where passengers weren’t in their seats and buckled up. 

Fuck around and find out, despite age. 
 

This is a warning to all people who are passengers of any aircraft, for any duration.

 

 

I added the edit, but I can't pretend though that I'm knowledgeable in the minutia of avionics because I'm not. 

 

If I pretend to be something that I'm not, people won't be able to take me seriously when I talk about other subjects like hockey and politics.  That's why when I talk about something I'm not entirely sure of, I refuse to give absolutes.  In this subject for instance, I believe 99% that it was turbulence because I don't see how anything else could cause the lift from underneath the wings to suddenly fail.  Can I say for absolute certainty and with authority that it was turbulence, no.  As a non-betting man, would I put most of my net worth on it having been turbulence?  Hell yeah I would.  That seems to be easy money. 

 

Like I said, my total experience in flying planes is a handful of hours in a Cessna 150 that was so old that it's stall warnings came in the form of these annoying tiny mechanical air thingies on the side of the plane cockpit instead of a more modern electronic warning.

 

This is part of my original post.

 

8 hours ago, Sabrefan1 said:

When the flight attendants say keep your seat buckled, they aren't kidding.  Turbulence kills... literally

 

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17 hours ago, Sharpshooter said:


I get you are ‘clearing’ Boeing. 
 

I hope you are now proffering that. 
 

In any case, this was a situation where passengers weren’t in their seats and buckled up. 

Fuck around and find out, despite age. 
 

This is a warning to all people who are passengers of any aircraft, for any duration. 
 

 

 

... And there we go.  The actual experts are convinced that it was clear air turbulence, not the plane...  Modern planes cannot detect it apparently.

 

Edit to original post with this quote and link incoming...

 

https://apnews.com/article/singapore-airlines-turbulence-bangkok-hospitalized-c3750c6b6f611acd771766b999d7468d

 

Quote

The U.S.-based Association of Flight Attendants said clear air turbulence is virtually undetectable with current technology. “One second, you’re cruising smoothly; the next, passengers, crew and unsecured carts or other items are being thrown around the cabin,” it said.

 

 

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On 5/22/2024 at 2:36 PM, Sabrefan1 said:

 

... And there we go.  The actual experts are convinced that it was clear air turbulence, not the plane...  Modern planes cannot detect it apparently.

 

Edit to original post with this quote and link incoming...

 

https://apnews.com/article/singapore-airlines-turbulence-bangkok-hospitalized-c3750c6b6f611acd771766b999d7468d

 

 

 


With respect to you and your experience. And you and the points are certainly respected by me. 
 

Pre-flight Briefing

Before take-off, pilots receive a comprehensive weather briefing. This includes information about potential turbulence along the planned route. Armed with this data, pilots can make informed decisions about altitude adjustments or route changes to minimise the impact of anticipated turbulence.
 

Clear Air Turbulence (CAT)

Clear Air Turbulence, often encountered at higher altitudes in cloudless skies, poses a unique challenge. Since it’s not associated with visible clouds, pilots rely on weather reports, turbulence forecasts, and reports from other aircraft to anticipate and navigate through CAT
 

Seatbelt Sign

Passengers are often reminded to keep their seatbelts fastened during the flight in case clear air turbulence is experienced and the seatbelt sign is illuminated when turbulence is expected or encountered. Pilots prioritise the safety of passengers and crew, and the seatbelt sign serves as a precautionary measure to ensure everyone is secure during turbulent conditions.
 

Weather Radar and Detection Systems

Modern aircraft are equipped with sophisticated weather radar systems and associated turbulence (thunderstorms); however, CAT cannot be detected by the weather radar.  Pilots use the weather radar to identify and navigate around areas of turbulence. The real-time data allows them to make timely decisions to enhance passenger comfort and safety.
 

I mean, it goes on and on. 
 

 

https://www.bristol.gs/how-do-pilots-handle-turbulence/

 

 

Did I speak ‘out of turn’? 

Should I continue? 
 

 

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:


With respect to you and your experience. And you and the points are certainly respected by me. 
 

Pre-flight Briefing

Before take-off, pilots receive a comprehensive weather briefing. This includes information about potential turbulence along the planned route. Armed with this data, pilots can make informed decisions about altitude adjustments or route changes to minimise the impact of anticipated turbulence.
 

Clear Air Turbulence (CAT)

Clear Air Turbulence, often encountered at higher altitudes in cloudless skies, poses a unique challenge. Since it’s not associated with visible clouds, pilots rely on weather reports, turbulence forecasts, and reports from other aircraft to anticipate and navigate through CAT
 

Seatbelt Sign

Passengers are often reminded to keep their seatbelts fastened during the flight in case clear air turbulence is experienced and the seatbelt sign is illuminated when turbulence is expected or encountered. Pilots prioritise the safety of passengers and crew, and the seatbelt sign serves as a precautionary measure to ensure everyone is secure during turbulent conditions.
 

Weather Radar and Detection Systems

Modern aircraft are equipped with sophisticated weather radar systems and associated turbulence (thunderstorms); however, CAT cannot be detected by the weather radar.  Pilots use the weather radar to identify and navigate around areas of turbulence. The real-time data allows them to make timely decisions to enhance passenger comfort and safety.
 

I mean, it goes on and on. 
 

 

https://www.bristol.gs/how-do-pilots-handle-turbulence/

 

 

Did I speak ‘out of turn’? 

Should I continue? 
 

 

 

 

 

Ah.  That's a cool read.  Thanks.   The lessons in that Cessna 150 that I took, we pushed the plane out from under the canopy it was parked in, got in, used my feet to steer it to the runway, called over the radio to the bored guy in the tower, and after he cleared us, taxi'd to the runway, then accelerated and took off. 

 

In my final few lessons/hours before I decided against getting a pilot license, I was doing touch and goes.  It was the most eventful time of that guy in the tower's day.  Every time I had to pull back up and abandon the touch because I wasn't coming in properly, he probably got a good chuckle.

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11 minutes ago, Sabrefan1 said:

 

Ah.  That's a cool read.  Thanks.   The lessons in that Cessna 150 that I took, we pushed the plane out from under the canopy it was parked in, got in, used my feet to steer it to the runway, called over the radio to the bored guy in the tower, and after he cleared us, taxi'd to the runway, then accelerated and took off. 

 

In my final few lessons/hours before I decided against getting a pilot license, I was doing touch and goes.  It was the most eventful time of that guy in the tower's day.  Every time I had to pull back up and abandon the touch because I wasn't coming in properly, he probably got a good chuckle.


Perhaps it’s an altitude issue?

 

Not sure where ‘our’ disagreement stems from. 
 

 

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56 minutes ago, Sharpshooter said:


You’re totally allowed to ‘chirp’ back at me with any picture or gif you want. 
 

It’s all good. 
 

Just boys being boys. 
 

🍻

 

No worries.  I get in silly moods occasionally too and feel the urge to mess with people.  😉

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